Month: Jan 2010

REMEMBERING ONKGOPOTSE TIRO 36 YEARS AFTER HIS BRUTAL MURDER

Writing about heroic leaders in the African Valhalla, the late Professor Ivan Van Sertima wrote that when a star dies it does not vanish from the firmament. Its light keeps streaming across the fields of time and space so that centuries later we may be touched by a vision of the fire and brilliancy of its former life. The lives of the truly great are just like that. Death does not diminish them in the firmament of our consciousness, where their words and deeds still twinkle like the lights of long-dead stars. But we are touched by these lights in different ways in different times and it is not always easy for the observer to distinguish the startling flash of a transitory meteor from the paler, ghostly light of a grander and greater star.

MOELETSI MBEKI HAS LOST IT!! – A CRITIQUE OF SO CALLED ‘ARCHITECTS OF POVERTY’

Taking the title of his book (Architects of Poverty: Why African Capitalism Needs Changing) for instance, since when is capitalism regional or racial and/ or for that matter ethnically, racially or continentally defined as Xhosa, Zulu, Tswana, Sotho, Swahili, European, Indian, American, White or Black mode or type of capitalism. What is the meaning of the term African Capitalism? And just for interest sake, what will be the defining or discriminating issue(s) of these modes or types of capitalism? The number of females invested who have invested in it? And if there is African capitalism there should also be an Indian capitalism, Chinese capitalism etcetera and in the individual cases what are the defining and discriminating factor(s).

For starters there is only capitalism not African capitalism. To claim Africanism stinks of (white) stereotyping and cliché which basically emanates from white reactionaries. Further regarding the claim that Africa in its development efforts has received a lot of assistance from the West but to no avail Moeletsi should know that unlike what he professes the West really has not done much to assist the African countries. African initiatives once they do not coincide with Western interest are always sabotaged or schemes are put in place to remove initiators of such initiatives.

HOW CAN VIRUSES JUMP SPECIES, MR. LAURENCE??

The Truth About AIDS
The Truth About AIDS

It is unbelievable that in the 21st century The Star (6th January 2010) can publish an article whose author, Jeremy Laurence purports that “HIV is thought to have crossed from chimpanzees to humans in West Africa in the last century and more than 25 million people worldwide have since died from it”. The story that HIV originated from any primate (monkey, chimpanzee, baboon in Africa) is baseless and has long been declared scientifically untenable.

When the virus first made headlines in the early 1980’s, it was claimed that it originated from green monkeys. This is what came to be known as monkey business in a book titled Aids, Africa and Racism by Richard Chirimuuta and Rosalind Chirimuuta, first published in 1987. Secondly, on viruses and other pathogens “jumping species”, Laurence and the faceless people he is bidding for, are obfuscating the issue of genetic engineering that has been spawning dangerous recombinant viruses like Simian virus 40 (SV 40) which was engineered in 1972 by a group of scientists.

EXPLOITATION OF BLUE-COLLAR WORKERS ROBS THE WORKPLACE OF THRIVING CAPABILITY

There are various participants in the workplace, namely, external and internal stakeholders. The external participants are customers, suppliers and the community. Internal participants are owners, blue-collar workers and white-collar workers. These participants have different roles, responsibilities and relationships with the workplace and with each other. The contemporary structure of reward and recognition is disproportionate with the contribution of various stakeholders. In terms of this structure the higher the contribution the lower the rewards and vice versa.

Customers are consumers of workplace products therefore the reason for existence of the enterprise. Suppliers provide critical ingredients for products while the owner provides the capital to start the workplace. Owners are rewarded through dividends and surplus extraction methods. The community regulates workplace behaviour through legislation and taxes. It further provides common infrastructure and platforms to conduct business. It is rewarded through taxes and other corporate social responsibility programs. Their relationship with production is clear and their contribution is measurable although the fair value question remains.

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