Bantu Biko

THE STRUGGLE FOR MENTAL LIBERATION AND RESTORATION OF SOVEREIGNTY OF THE AFRICAN MIND

It is complex and dangerous to compel African people to be critical of their role in perpetuating their own oppression. It is complex because constructive criticism is a critical ingredient in the development of the strong African nation and it is dangerous to the one who dares to drag African society to self criticism running the risks of being seen as a traitor, naïve or labelled all sorts of nasty things. It is dangerous to the African nation as self-introspection data can be used to reinforce pessimistic view of Africa and African people. External forces with geopolitical interest can overt or convert utilisation self-analysis to absolve oppressor’s guilt by blaming the oppressed.

The colonial powers have invested heavily on the destruction of African minds. The education systems have been designed to reinforce perceptions of white supremacy and African inferiority. The print media fortifies images of European heroes and African villains on the minds of our people. The visual media is consistently portraying beauty from a Eurocentric point of view. The audio media pump messages that equate civilisation of Africans to their assimilation to white culture and values.

ZUMA‘S STATE OF THE NATION ADDRESS WAS A DISAPPOINTING REMIX OF THE SAME OLD SONG

Since South Africa’s inception as a “democracy” in 1994, there has always been a tinkering on the edges of the country’s socio-economic problems. There is a lot of playing around with words and repeating the same themes in all the state of the nation addresses without any substance or walking the talk. And there is this sycophantic cheering cohort some of whom are awakened by the clapping of hands and join in, while at the same time wiping off the drool on the sides of their mouths because they had been driveling. One wonders what they would be applauding. No head of state has ever tried to grab the bull by the horns. In his 11th February 2010 ‘state of the nation’ speech, President Jacob Zuma said the economy was turning the corner. I disagree. The appropriate phrase Zuma should have used is ‘cutting corners’. The reason why Zuma and all his predecessors failed is that “the discovery of general laws in the field of economics is made difficult by the circumstances that observed economic phenomena are often affected by many factors which are very hard to evaluate separately. In addition, the experience which has accumulated since the beginning of the so-called civilized period of human history has been largely influenced and limited by causes which are by no means exclusively economic by nature”. For example, we were conquered and owe our existence to conquest. Those who conquered us, some of whom Zuma praised in his speech, established themselves legally and economically as the privileged class of our conquered country.

%d bloggers like this: